Microsoft .net Orleans

The Microsoft Orleans project (http://dotnet.github.io/orleans/) is a .NET framework for building systems on an Actor Model paradigm.

A typical transactional system receives a command and executes it. Executing it usually means fetching data from a database, modifying it and then saving it.

The reason I was interested in Orleans for To-Do.Studio was that each action in the app generates a command, there is no save button, no transactional boundary. This naturally creates a chatty interface, where many small commands are sent to the server, which much for each: get data, modify it and save it. Combine that with the fact that NOSQL components such as CosmosDB make you pay for reads and what you have is an expensive bottleneck.

The Actor Model in Orleans would have fixed this for me by doing the following. The first time a command executes which references a particular domain object, a grain is activated and the data is read. Each command then modifies the data in the grain. Eventually, when no one uses the grain the system will deactivate the grain causing it to save itself.

This would have the added benefit for us to minimize data access costs and offer speedups similar to adding a caching layer.

As with all magic though, we lose some control:

  1. First thing is that as the system scales to thousands of users and tens of thousands of grains, we have to think of system scalability (Orleans doesn`t yet deactivate resources based on memory pressure, only an “unused delay”)
  2. The deployment model is not fully integrated with Azure.
    1. Hosting is possible within a VM – not PAAS enough for me
    2. Hosting is possible within worker roles – sounds interesting but not exactly what I want
    3. Hosting is possible within Service Fabric (which is another implementation of an Actor Model from the Azure team and not the .NET team) – doesn’t feel seamless this would be my ideal hosting option)
    4. Host in a Linux container which is scaled automatically by Kubernetes – to be honest, I am not a container fan; Ido see their advantages for certain workloads, but it feels like the PAAS of infrastructure people.

Anyways, my best option would be hosting on top of Service Fabric. It would need to be 100% integrated with dotnetcore stuff though.

I could also recommend having a dedicated PASS offering for Orleans (kind of like what happened with SignalR).

Finally, Orleans should be upgraded to support memory pressure for deactivations as well as some sort of queuing mechanism when grains start swapping to keep the amount of work which is executing in parallel rationalized.

 
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